Energy

Why we can’t rely on wind power

by Rob Lyons
spiked

“As we approach the COP26 climate talks in Glasgow, the government has been proudly trumpeting its Net Zero commitments. But the embarrassing fact is that Britain has been forced to burn coal again this week in order to stop blackouts. On Monday, with the wind down to a mere whisper, the National Grid had to blow a huge sum of money on bringing an old coal plant back online,” according to spiked.

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Deregulation and U.S. Energy Independence

by Paul M. Dabbar
The Wall Street Journal

“The U.S. in 2019 became a net exporter of energy and achieved energy independence. Once at the mercy of hostile foreign governments that used energy supply as a cudgel, the U.S. is now the third-largest energy exporter in the world—a stunning reversal that has driven down prices for American consumers and created more than 10 million jobs in domestic energy,” according to The Wall Street Journal.

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Of Course, We Should Blame the Greens for the Energy Crunch

by Noah Rothman
Commentary

“New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman is concerned. Energy prices are spiking all over the globe, setting into motion a confluence of events that could destabilize Western democracies and augment the power enjoyed by anti-Western petrostates like Iran and Russia. Worst of all, he writes, ‘I fear we’ll see a populist backlash to the whole climate/green movement.’ The Times headline advises its readers to commit to an ideological goal ahead of this crisis: ‘Don’t Blame the Greens.’ But Friedman doesn’t seem to have taken this advice,” according to Commentary.

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Natural gas prices spike as gun-shy shale producers hold back

by Josh SIegel
Washington Examiner

“‘While natural gas prices are not as visible to consumers as retail pump gasoline prices, any persistent spike will hit consumers already grappling with broadly rising prices,’ said Bob McNally, a former top energy official in the George W. Bush administration. He now leads the research group Rapidan Energy. ‘That we are in much better shape than Europe won’t be of much solace to the Biden administration if this winter is cold,’” according to the Washington Examiner.

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Spain’s rare earths pit greens against tech security — and profit

by Valentin Bontemps
Yahoo! News

“Spain’s untapped rare earths are stoking tensions between mining companies and environmentalists and farmers who fear the devastating impact from extracting the minerals considered as essential for a high-tech and low-carbon economy.  The group of 17 minerals are — despite their name — widely distributed across the globe, but exist in such thin concentrations that extracting even small quantities requires the processing of enormous quantities of ore,” according to Yahoo!News.

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How Not to Do an Energy Transition

by Rochelle Toplensky
The Wall Street Journal

“Utilities are generally a local business given differences in regulation, but the U.K. experience provides two broad lessons for other countries. First, the energy transition requires a new set of rules; tinkering with the old ones likely won’t work. Second, flexibility is the key to creating a resilient low-carbon system,” according to The Wall Street Journal.

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Don’t Sabotage Energy Reliability and Affordability

By Rich Nolan
New Hampshire Journal

“Unfortunately, included in the House Reconciliation bill now working its way through Congress is a $150 billion proposal that could turn already emerging reliability and affordability concerns into a full-blown crisis.  This proposal is an incentive program on steroids that aims to reshape the nation’s electricity mix in just nine short years,” according to the New Hampshire Journal.

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Coal Shortages Push Up Prices, Weigh on Economies

by Chuin-Wei Yap, Kejal Vyas and Chieko Tsuneoka
The Wall Street Journal

“The crunch has many causes—from the post-pandemic boom to supply-chain strains and ambitious targets for reducing carbon emissions. And it is expected to last at least through the winter, raising fears in many countries of fuel shortfalls in the months ahead.  Australia’s Newcastle thermal coal, a global benchmark, is trading at $202 a metric ton, three times higher than at the end of 2019. Global production of coal, which generates around 40% of the world’s electricity, is about 5% below pre-pandemic levels,” according to The Wall Street Journal.

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With the New Energy Reality, the Game Has Changed. Solar and Wind Alone Can’t Meet Growing Power Demand.

by Dan Ervin
Real Clear Energy

“If electricity demand does increase by 50 to 100 percent, then we must think in terms of adding generation that is reliable. This does not include wind or solar. Our baseload electricity generation must be reliable and affordable. Natural gas has been the recent choice and is responsible for the decline in carbon dioxide emissions in the U. S.  It is my view that a switch to small modular reactors is the optimal choice,” according to Real Clear Energy.

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China power shortage threatens supply chain disruption and higher prices

by Jeremy Beaman
Washington Examiner

“Electricity customers across China were forced to spend periods of the last few weeks in the dark as utilities cut out the lights to manage significant power shortages.  The consequences are leading to forecasts of additional obstacles to a global economic recovery, with the disruptions to the world’s second-largest economy expected to raise prices and compound existing supply chain issues,” according to the Washington Examiner.

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With Oil Prices Rising, Why Isn’t U.S. Shale Production Surging?

by Ellen R. Wald, Ph.D.
Investing.com

“After all, American fracking has been described as “nimble,” so where did that flexibility go?  The most common reason cited by prominent U.S. oil companies is that they plan to keep production flat in order to raise dividends for shareholders. A rather convenient answer, enabling them to focus their efforts on factors that make them more attractive to investors, but this answer doesn’t tell the whole story,” according to Investing.com.

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80 million European households struggle to stay warm. Rising energy costs will make the problem worse

by Wale Azeez
CNN Business

“Experts, anti-poverty organizations and environmental campaigners are warning that the coronavirus pandemic and rising prices have intensified a longstanding problem tied to a combination of high energy costs, low household incomes and homes that aren’t energy efficient,” according to CNN Business.

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Fossil fuels are back — everywhere except in the USA

by Stephen Moore
Washington Examiner

“Euroland is also starting to give up on the green energy dreams that are still alive and well in the minds of American pols in Washington, D.C. Great Britain and Germany have experienced soaring energy prices at the gas pump and in electric utility costs for homes, factories, and businesses. Some relief will come from natural gas that will eventually be supplied to Europe via a gas pipeline from Siberia, Russia. Don’t forget, Biden greenlighted that pipeline just a few weeks after killing the Keystone XL pipeline and thousands of jobs here at home,” according to the Washington Examiner.

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Biden’s Energy Price Shock

by The Editorial Board
The Wall Street Journal

“Goldman Sachs projects that crude could hit $90 a barrel by year end, which could add 10 to 20 cents a gallon to gasoline prices at the pump. White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki on Tuesday assured Americans that the Administration is speaking ‘to international partners, including OPEC’ about ‘doing more to support the recovery.’ How about encouraging more U.S. production?” according to The Wall Street Journal.

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Why Do ‘Fracking’ Opponents Ignore Its Moral Benefits?

by Jude Clemente
Forbes

“As perhaps the most important global energy development of the 21st Century, too many of our policymakers seem unaware of the benefits that ‘fracking’ for oil and natural gas has given us.  Not just from a supply perspective, from 2008-2019, U.S. crude oil production jumped 150% to 12.3 million b/d with marketed gas up 70% to 99 Bcf/d, but from a national security and economic perspective, American shale has been a boon,” according to Forbes.

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An Energy Crisis Is the Latest Threat to Food Supplies

by Nicholas Larkin
Bloomberg

“In the U.K., it also raised the specter of an almost immediate shortage of carbon dioxide, a by-product of fertilizer production and widely by the food and drink industry.  A lack of CO2 would force slaughterhouses — which use the gas to stun animals — to close, at a time when staff shortages have left British farms crammed with roughly 100,000 extra pigs. It’s hitting grocery stores, too, because CO2 is used in packaging to extend the shelf life of food and for the “dry ice” that keeps items frozen during delivery, as well as giving soda and beer their fizz,” according to Bloomberg.

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